Skip to main content

I’ll be back – The Russian Terminator resurfaces

Latest BMBT Terminator 2 version 

After the disastrous experiences of the first Chechen war that led to the destruction of the Russian mechanized forces in the concrete canyons of the Grozny, Russia has been slowly developing a heavy infantry fighting vehicle for urban combat. The vehicle is based on the tried and tested T-72 main battle tank. The vehicle it’s designated BMPT, with a catchy nickname the “Terminator”.

The designs of the armored vehicles have traditionally been compromises between mobility, armor protection and fire power. In an urban setting the mobility aspect is morphed from pure maneuverability into the ability to cross and penetrate barriers and navigate the constantly changing landscape. The armor protection is more important as the fighting distances are shorter and the enemy is often able to engage from extremely short distances and even from above. In regards to the fire power, it’s often more important to be able to suppress the hostile forces rather than to be able to hit point targets at extended ranges.

Similar experiences from Lebanon and Gaza have prompted Israel to develop and field several MBT based heavy infantry fighting vehicles and armored personnel carriers such as the Achzarit, Puma and Namer that are based on the T-55, Centurion and Merkava tanks respectively. If two major armies with broad experience of close quarters combat against insurgents in urban environment are reaching similar solutions the need is there.

Merkava based Namer APC (US. Army)

While the Israeli solutions are lightly armed and mainly intended to transport the IDF infantry forces safely to their objectives without getting bogged down into a destructive confrontation with the enemy light forces. As the IDF operates as an occupation force. On the other hand the Russian solution is a fire support oriented vehicle, whose sole purpose is to eliminate all threats as the mechanized force wipes out the enemy entrenched in an urban center.

The BMPT has gone through several iterations by Uralvagonzavod. Original version had an T-72B hull and drive-train mated to a turret with a single 2A42 30 mm autocannon and a four-pack of 9M133 Kornet ATGM:s on one side of the turret. This initial version failed to attract any significant export interest or orders by the Russian military.

Single cannon variant aka Terminator 1


Second revision has a turret with twin 2A45 30 mm autocannons, a coaxial 7.62 PKT machine gun and four 9M120 Ataka missiles in individual tubes. All of the turret mounted weapons are situated above the gunner and commander. Both the commander and the gunner individual optics, with the commanders panoramic sight sitting on topof the weapons package.

Kazakh Terminator with TOS-1 Buratino in the background


The T-72 hull was modified to fit extra ERA-armor and two 30 mm AG-17D automatic grenade launchers pointed towards the frontal sector. An important feature for the intended urban combat role was the ability to engage three different targets simultaneously. Also the main guns have an ability to fire to very high angles often encountered near high rise buildings. This version was sold in small numbers to Kazakhstan and Algeria, but the Russian armed forces didn’t place any orders.

In 2013 the Uralvagonzavod revealed the next iteration of the Terminator, dubbed the BMPT-72 Terminator 2. This version had a revised turret with more advanced fire control systems and communications equipment. The four Ataka missiles were also placed into two rectangular canisters.

The hull layout was revised by removing of the 30 mm AG-17D grenade launchers. At the same time crew was reduced to three.The hull superstructure was also modified with newer ERA armor and a better sloped design. The BMPT-72 was offered as an upgrade package to breath new life into the legacy T-72 fleets that many military's struggle with.

BMPT-72


The first actual operational use of the Terminator concept came in 2017 as at least one was sent into Syria to support the government forces. Curiously this variant had the older BMPT hull, with the 30 mm grenade launchers, combined in to the new turret with improved sights and the boxed missiles. Hull was also upgraded with new slat-armor modules at the rear and improved ERA layout. The Syrian model was also equipped with bag-mounted add-on armor modules at the sides of the skirts. These modules have been previously spotted on the T-72B3 tanks.

BMBT-72 turret in a Terminator 2 hull with add-on armor bags in Syria

Same version with the older grenade launcher equipped hull and the new turret was shown at the Russian Army-2017 exhibition. During the exhibition the Terminator made several combat shows. It was also announced that the version wold enter mass production, but exact procurement numbers were not released.

Later on the Terminator made an appearance at the Zapad-2017 exercise operating with the Russian mechanized forces in the Luga region. It’s believed that at least one example is now used by the 1st Guards Tank Army.

BMPT-72 turret with the older hull in Zapad2017 exercise.


There is also a Terminator-3 version, that is based on the T-14 Armata platform. The issues with the T-14 have delayed the introduction of the Terminator-3 in to the future. It’s unknown if any have actualy been orderd so far beyond the sinlge prototype shown in the Victory Day parades.


It remains to be seen if the Terminator will be a game changer or a sideshow. While up-armored IFV:s are here to stay and most nations are adding both ERA and active protection systems to their vehicles, the concept of a dedicated fire support vehicle without an actual high caliber tank gun or something similar is stilla an uniquely Russian concept.

Here is my previous blog about the other Russian tank projects:
http://blog.vantagepointnorth.net/2017/09/steel-quartet-russian-tank-programs.html

Sources:
https://sputniknews.com/military/201707071055327078-russia-tank-support-combat-vehicle/
https://thaimilitaryandasianregion.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/bmpt-72-terminator-2-tank-support-armoured-fighting-vehicle/
http://www.businessinsider.com/russia-just-deployed-the-terminator-to-syria-heres-what-it-can-do-2017-8?r=US&IR=T&IR=T
http://www.army-technology.com/projects/-bmpt-72-terminator-2-tank-support-combat-vehicle/

Comments

  1. Nice post! This is a very nice that I will definitively come back to more times this year! Thanks for informative post.jogos friv online
    Jogos live
    jogos friv 4 school

    ReplyDelete

  2. Considering that my cousin is a soldier, I am actually aware of this. Of course, it is not simple to make an assignment, just like it is difficult to create an assignment, which is why many students prefer to create online, just like I obtain my work from a list of write your reportservice. that is latest thing for everyone.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Quick guide to identifying the Russian tanks Part 1: Updated Dec. 2021

  As most of the western nations have reduced their inventories to a few or mostly one type of main battle tank model in their active inventories, the myriad of tank platforms and distinct versions employed by the Russian armed forces may feel overwhelming. Here is a quick guide to identifying Russian MBTs. When you come across an image (or the actual thing), follow the steps to identify it properly. Updated 15.12.2021: T-90 modifications Family of the tank Russian Armed Forces currently operates, or at least storage, the following tank platforms/families: -            T-55 (<2000 in storage) -            T-62 (2000 in storage) -            T-64 (2000 in storage) -            T-72 (2000 active duty, 8000 in storage) -            T-80 (2000 active duty, 5000 in storage) -            T-90 (350 active duty, 600  in storage) -            T-14 (20 in field testing) So how can you identify what type of a tank are you looking at? There are two features that can be used to distinguishing th

Russian Tanks 2022: Thicker and Blinder

  Since the all out invasion of Ukraine the Russian army has lost at least 1700 tanks. This has caused the Russian army some supply problems, when they are re-forming their mauled units. Fighting has also revealed the need for upgrades on most of the Russian tank designs. The most obvious issues with the existing Russian tank fleet are the insufficient armor protection, the lack of reverse mobility and the vulnerability of the automatic loaders and their ammunition carousels. Although the last one has gifted us the sport of Turret Throwing. T-72B obr 2022 tanks Very little can be done for the mobility with the limitations of the existing transmissions and the autoloaders can’t really be replaced with better designs or human loaders either. The armor part on the other hand can be improved during the activation and refurbishment of the deep stored Soviet-era tanks. The first new design that appeared in the battlefield was an upgraded T-72B3 with additional armo,r mimicking the T-90M layo

Russian Spring offensive 2023: Kyiv Take Two

Russian T-80U tanks stuck and abandoned in Ukraine in spring 2022   The spectacular Ukrainian victories during the 2022 forced the Russian army to the defensive. With the Russian retreat from Kharkiv and the areas north of the river Dnipro in Kherson, the focus of the fighting has returned to the Donbass. The Russian forces, with Wagner mercenaries and penal battalions doing the bulk of the fighting and dying, are trying to take Bakhmut in a battle that invokes parallels to the meat grinders of the Great war. The Ukrainian armed forces on the other hand are slowly making progress towards Kreminna. Despite the continuous rumors about a new massive round of mobilizations, the Russian army cannot sustain the present level of attrition indefinitely. By throwing enough men and material against the prepared Ukrainian positions manned by experienced and highly motivated defenders, Russians may be able to gain some localized breakthroughs. But even if the Russian mechanized forces are able to