Skip to main content

Belorussian cocktail shakes

Belorussian cocktail shakes

Belorussian innovation, BMP-2 camouflages made from old newspapers. Easy, fast and environmentally friendy
Few things in Europe have been as stable as Belarus. It has been a staunch ally of the Putin regime. Belarus and its leader Alexander Lukashenko, have participated in Russian led Eurasian Economic Union and the two nations have tried to establish a supranational confederation. While the nations are closely knit with economic ties the progress on the confederation has been slow. Recently rumors have been circulating that President Lukashenko has been reluctant to relinquish control of his nation. The old collective farm head has after all ruled Belarus with an iron grip since 1994.
Up until 2017 the disputes between Belarus and Russia have stayed mostly under the radar. Only some disputes involving the Russian energy giants have received any attention in the international media. Against this backdrop most analysts dealing with Belarus were surprised, when the Russian newspaper Kommersant published a story that President Lukashenko was going to pull Belarus out of most co-operation mechanisms with Russia. This would be a major blow to the EEU that is one of the pet projects of the Russian President Vladimir Putin. Kommersant speculated that Lukashenko would announce the move in his annual speech.
President Lukashenko has recently made moves to please the European nations. Belarus lifted visa requirements from citizens of 80 countries. This move at least partially prompted Russian FSB to re-establish border controls between Belarus and Russia. One reason for the cooling relations between Moscow and Minsk is the economic downfall that has clutched both nations. Belarus owes Russia over half a billion dollars for gas and petrol. Russia has also repeatedly requested Belarus to give Russian air-force a permanent base in Belarus.
Kommersant article coincided with an announcement that large parts of the Belorussian army were going to deploy out on training maneuvers. Regular troops would be joined by a large number of reservists being called up for refresher training. Belorussian army has been traditionally positioned to defend the country from attacks coming from its western NATO neighbors.
Belorussian fortification built along the Minsk — Moscow highway
This time the heavy mechanized forces deployed east from the capital Minsk. Troops began building field fortifications and defensive positions facing Russia along the Minsk — Moscow highway. This is the first time in decades that Belorussian troops have turned their tanks against Russia. As the exercise progressed it was confirmed that over 3000 reservists were called in. These were mostly older officers and NCOs. This could indicate that Belarus is currently preparing for a full scale mobilization.
Speculations are running wild about what the real situation is and what is going to happen next. I’ve sketched 3 possible scenarios:
1) Belarus breaks ties with Russia to close with the EU. This would cause strong economic and political reactions from Moscow. Military intervention by Russia is possible, but not probable.
2)The crisis is fabricated for domestic Belorussian consumption. Lukashenko will use the heightened tensions to strong-arm economic help from Russia.
3) The whole political crisis is just “maskirovka”, deception, the real goal is to mask the mobilization of the Belorussian army. Belarus is essential in all Russian battle plans that involve either Ukraine or the Baltic. There is a straight highway from the Belorussian defensive positions to Kiev.
The scariest alternative is that Russia demanded that Belarus would participate in number 3, but the Kremlin plans were too evil even for a pseudo-dictator like Lukashenko.

Comments

  1. I am glad you take pride in what you write. This makes you stand way out from many other writers that push poorly written contentjogos friv gratis
    Jogos online
    jogos 4 school

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Quick guide to identifying the Russian tanks Part 1: main platforms and T-72 variants

As most of the western nations have reduced their inventories to a few or mostly one type of main battle tank model in their active inventories, the myriad of tank platforms and distinct versions employed by the Russian armed forces may feel overwhelming. Here is a quick guide to identifying Russian MBTs. When you come across an image (or the actual thing), follow the steps to identify it properly. Family of the tank Russian Armed Forces currently operates, or at least storage, the following tank platforms/families: -           T-55 (<2000 in storage) -           T-62 (2000 in storage) -           T-64 (2000 in storage) -           T-72 (2000 active duty, 8000 in storage) -           T-80 (2000 active duty, 5000 in storage) -           T-90 (350 active duty, 600  in storage) -           T-14 (20 in field testing) So how can you identify what type of a tank are you looking at? There are two features that can be used to distingu

The Hammer and the Sickle - Potential Russian Pincer-Offensive

For the past weeks the social media has been filled with sightings of Russian troops moving towards the regions bordering Ukraine. The buildup was initially called an exercise, but in the most recent press releases Kremlin has been rather clear that the troops have been deployed there as an operational deployment, if Russia feels a need to act upon any real or imaginary escalation in Donbass. The troops will stay in the region as long as President Putin sees it necessary. Russia Serna-Class landing crafts of the Caspian flotilla The initial buildup was focused on occupied Crimea that has so far received an additional VDV airborne regiment, multiple mechanized battalion tactical groups and heavy artillery units equipped with at least the enormous 240mm 2S4 Tulpan mortars.  Additional trains and convoys have been spotted in Rostov, Krasnodar and Voronezh regions. The Russian controlled Belarusian military has also been alerted and multiple, very Russian looking units are operating in the

Energy deal ties Finland to the Russian Nord Stream 2

A Finnish energy company Fortum has been negotiating with the German E.ON to buy a German energy company called Uniper. The deal has been controversial in Finland as it would include a large number of coal fired power plants that do not fit the Fortum’s strategy of becoming a sustainable and green energy producer. As 50,8 % of Fortum is owned by the Finnish government, the deal has an obvious political angle. (Photo: Nord Stream) The most disturbing aspect of the deal is that Uniper owns a 950 Million € share of the Russo-German gas pipeline project Nord Stream 2 . The Finnish minister responsible for directing the state owned companies is the Center Party’s Mika Lintilä. He stated that he didn’t have any information about the Uniper’s share of the gas pipeline. He also stated that the Finnish government would not veto the deal even if it would link Finland to the controversial pipeline and Russian geopolitical interests. Finland, unlike the Baltic States and Sweden,